Magnesium in Digesta of Horses Fed Diets Containing Different Amounts of Phytate

  • T. Matsui
  • Y. Murakami
  • H. Yano
Chapter

Abstract

Approximately 70% of total plant phosphorus exists as inositol hexaphosphate (phytate). Phosphorus in phytate is generally considered to be poorly available in many mammals because 95% of phytate was recovered in the ileum of humans and dietary phytase improved phosphorus availability in pigs fed diets consisting of plant proteins rich in phytate. Phytate is also suggested to suppress magnesium absorption through making insoluble complex with magnesium because dephytinization of diets increased magnesium solubility in the small intestine and magnesium absorption (Hirabayashi, et al., 1995). On the other hand, Hintz et al. (1973) suggested that phytate phosphorus was available in equine because there was phytase activity in the lower gut. Thus, phytate may not affect magnesium absorption in horses. This experiment was conducted to study apparent magnesium movement in the gastrointestinal tract of horses fed different contents of phytate.

Keywords

Phytic Acid Magnesium Absorption Phytase Activity Insoluble Complex Thoroughbred Horse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Hintz, H.F., and Schryver, H.F. (1972) Magnesium metabolism in the horse. Journal of Animal Science 35,755–759Google Scholar
  2. Hintz, H.F., Williams, A. J., Rogoff, J., and Schryver, H.F. (1973) Availability of phosphorus in wheat bran when fed to ponies. Journal of. Animal Science 36,522–525Google Scholar
  3. Hirabayashi, M., Matsui, T., and Yano, H. (1995) Fermentation of soybean by Aspergillus Usamii increases magnesium availability in rats. Japanese Journal of Magnesium Research 14,45–53Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Matsui
    • 1
  • Y. Murakami
    • 1
  • H. Yano
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Applied BiosciencesGraduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto UniversitySakyo-ku, KyotoJapan

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