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Does boron play only a structural role in the growing tissues of higher plants?

  • Patrick H. Brown
  • Hening Hu
Part of the Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences book series (DPSS, volume 78)

Abstract

In species in which boron (B) mobility is limited, B deficiency only occurs in growing plant organs. As a consequence of the highly localized patterns of plant growth and the general immobility of B it has been extremely difficult to determine the primary function of B in plants. In species in which B is phloem mobile, the removal of B from the growth medium results in the depletion of B present in mature leaves. Thus, it is possible to develop mature leaves with increasingly severe levels of B depletion, thereby overcoming the complications of experiments based on growing tissues. Utilizing this approach we demonstrate here that B depletion of mature plum (Prunus salicind) leaves did not result in any discernible change in leaf appearance, membrane integrity or photosynthetic capacity even though B concentrations were reduced to 6–8 µg/g dwt, which is less than 30% of the reported tissue B requirement. Boron depletion, however, results in a severe disruption of plant growth and metabolism in young growing tissues. This experimental evidence and theoretical considerations suggest that the primary and possibly sole function of B, is as a structural component of growing tissues.

Key words

Boron deficiency function membrane mobility photosynthesis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick H. Brown
    • 1
  • Hening Hu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PomologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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