Some of My Pet-Peeves with Mathematics Education

Part of the Advances in Mathematics Education book series (AME)

Abstract

For nearly half-a-century I have been a mathematics-educator, and recently retired because of a mandatory retirement age for state workers in my country. As I think back over the years as to how the profession has changed, I am simultaneously proud and disillusioned. I am proud that there are so many different facets to our discipline, but at the same time I am disillusioned that there are so many different facets to our discipline, because we have seemingly lost sight of what our profession should be all about. Whereas many of us used to have appointments in departments of mathematics, the majority of us are now in departments of education, science teaching, cognitive science, and educational technology, where the teaching and learning of mathematics per se are attended to peripherally, if at all. Some colleagues claim we are discipline that has matured from it roots in mathematics; others however say we are a discipline that has lost its way. I am very much a member of this latter camp, a group that is shrinking in size daily. In an effort to inform the larger mathematical community of this state of affairs, I would like to put forth some of my pet-peeves on mathematics-education today.

Keywords

Mathematics-education Subtopic of mathematics Curriculum for mathematics-educators Future of classroom mathematics 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MathematicsBen-Gurion University of the NegevBeer-ShevaIsrael

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