Advertisement

Aldo Leopold: Connecting Conservation Science, Ethics, Policy, and Practice

  • Curt MeineEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Ecology and Ethics book series (ECET, volume 1)

Abstract

Creative interdisciplinary thinkers in the history of both ecology and ethics have ventured beyond their disciplinary boundaries and into the zone where they overlap. Prominent among these was Aldo Leopold. While serving as president of the Ecological Society of America in 1947, Leopold called for a “land ethic” that integrated insights from ecology, history, ethics, and aesthetics. Prompted especially by developments in science and technology following World War II, Leopold was part of a broader community of contemporaries concerned with these portentous changes. In retrospect, we can see Leopold’s special contribution as a defining moment in the discourse connecting conservation science, ethics, policy, and practice. That discourse continues, especially in emerging interdisciplinary fields, even as our critical environmental concerns renders the need for integrated thinking ever more apparent and immediate.

Keywords

Aldo Leopold Ecological Society of America Conservation Policy Ethics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

For their helpful insights and suggestions on this essay, I thank my colleagues J. Baird Callicott, Bruce Jennings, Estella Leopold, and Stan Temple, as well as the many attendees at the 2011 Cary Institute Conference, and the support provided by the National Science Foundation (SES-1058163, DEB −1057538) and the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity ( ICM-P05, and CONICYT-FB 023).

References

  1. Burgess R (2010) Paul B. Sears and the Ecological Society of America. Ohio J Sci 109:104–108Google Scholar
  2. Callicott JB (2008) What “wilderness” in frontier ecosystems? Environ Ethics 30(3):235–249CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Donnelley S (1995) The legacy of Hans Jonas. Hastings Center report 25, p 2Google Scholar
  4. Egerton FN (2012) Roots of ecology: antiquity to Haeckel. University of California Press, BerkeleyCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Errington P (1947) A question of values. J Wildl Manag 11:267–272CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Gross K (2001) It’s a good time to get involved: perspectives on the ESA, from Aldo Leopold to today. Bull Ecol Soc Am 82:112–118Google Scholar
  7. Leopold A (1949) A sand county almanac, and sketches here and there. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  8. Leopold A (1987) Foreword. In: Callicott JB (ed) Companion to A Sand County Almanac: interpretive & critical essays. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp 281–288Google Scholar
  9. Leopold A (1991a) Engineering and conservation. In: Flader SL, Callicott JB (eds) The river of the mother of god and other essays by Aldo Leopold. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp 249–254 [Originally composed, 1938]Google Scholar
  10. Leopold A (1991b) The state of the profession. In: Flader SL, Callicott JB (eds) The river of the mother of god and other essays by Aldo Leopold. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp 276–280 [Originally published, 1940]Google Scholar
  11. Leopold A (1991c) The ecological conscience. In: Flader SL, Callicott JB (eds) The river of the mother of god and other essays by Aldo Leopold. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp 338–346 [Originally published, 1947]Google Scholar
  12. McIntosh RP (1986) The background of ecology: concept and theory. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  13. Meine C (1999) Moving mountains: Aldo Leopold and A Sand County Almanac. In: Knight RL, Reidel S (eds) Aldo Leopold and the ecological conscience. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  14. Meine C (2010) Aldo Leopold: his life and work, 2nd edn. University of Wisconsin Press, MadisonGoogle Scholar
  15. Mumford L (1951) The conduct of life. Harcourt, Brace, and Company, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  16. Murie O (1954) Ethics in wildlife management. J Wildl Manag 18:289–293CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Nash RF (1989) The rights of nature: a history of environmental ethics. University of Wisconsin Press, MadisonGoogle Scholar
  18. Nisbet MC, Hixon MA, Moore KD, Nelson M (2010) Four cultures: new synergies for engaging society on climate change. Front Ecol Environ 8:329–331CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Robertson T (2012) Total war and the total environment: Fairfield Osborn, William Vogt, and the birth of global ecology. Environ Hist 17:336–364CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Sears PB (1950) Charles Darwin: the naturalist as a cultural force. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  21. Thomas WL (ed) (1956) Man’s role in changing the face of the earth. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  22. Whiteside KH (1998) Worldliness and respect for nature: an ecological application of Hannah Arendt’s conception of culture. Environ Value 7:25–40CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Worster D (1994) Nature’s economy: a history of ecological ideas. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Humans and Nature and Aldo Leopold FoundationBarabooUSA

Personalised recommendations