Proteins and Proteomics of Leishmania and Trypanosoma pp 77-101

Part of the Subcellular Biochemistry book series (SCBI, volume 74)

A2 and Other Visceralizing Proteins of Leishmania: Role in Pathogenesis and Application for Vaccine Development

  • Ana Paula Fernandes
  • Adriana Monte Cassiano Canavaci
  • Laura-Isobel McCall
  • Greg Matlashewski
Chapter

Abstract

Visceral leishmaniasis is a re-emergent disease and a significant cause of morbidity worldwide. Amongst the more than 20 Leishmania species, Leishmania donovani, Leishmania infantum and more rarely Leishmania amazonensis are associated with visceral leishmaniasis. A major question in leishmaniasis research is how these species migrate to and infect visceral organs whereas other species such as Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis remain in the skin, causing tegumentary leishmaniasis. Here we present the more recent advances and approaches towards the identification of species-specific visceralizing factors of Leishmania, such as the A2 protein, leading to a better understanding of parasite biology. We also discuss their potential use for the development of a vaccine for visceral leishmaniasis.

Abbreviations

cGAPDH

Cytosolic GAPDH

CL

Cutaneous leishmaniasis

CTL

Cytolytic T lymphocytes

CVL

Canine visceral leishmaniasis

DALYs

Disability-adjusted life years

DCL

Diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis

DCs

Dendritic cells

DHFR-TS

Dihydrofolate reductase-thymidilate synthase

ELISA

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

GAPDH

Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

gp

Glycoprotein

hsp

Heat shock protein

IFN-γ

Gamma interferon

Ig

Immunoglobulin

IL

Interleukin

iNOS

Inducible nitric oxide synthase

MHC

Major histocompatibility complex

ML

Mucosal leishmaniasis

mo-DCs

Monocyte-derived dendritic cells

mRNA

Messenger ribonucleic acid

NK

Natural killer

PCR

Polimerase chain reaction

PKDL

Post-kala azar dermal leishmaniasis

RNI

Radical nitrogen intermediates

ROI

Radical oxygen intermediates

SIDER

Small interspersed degenerate retroposons

TAP

Transporter associated with antigen processing

TGF-β

Transforming growth factor-beta

Th

T helper

TNF-α

Tumor Necrosis factor-alfa

Treg

Regulatory T cells

UPR

Unfolded protein response

UTR

Untranslated region

VL

Visceral leishmaniasis

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Paula Fernandes
    • 1
  • Adriana Monte Cassiano Canavaci
    • 1
  • Laura-Isobel McCall
    • 2
  • Greg Matlashewski
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculdade de FarmáciaUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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