‘When I Land in Islamabad I Feel Home and When I Land in Heathrow I Feel Home’

Gendered Belonging and Diasporic Identities of South Asian British Citizens in London, in Leicester and in North England
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Migration book series (IPMI, volume 6)

Abstract

According to Deleuze and Guattari (1987) ‘de-territorialization’ is followed by a moment of re-territorialization. This moment, however, has to be regarded as a continuing educational process that becomes a different spatial site of social practices. It is argued in this chapter that regional, local as well as global identification override national and mono-ethno cultural identities, while shaping particular notions of gendered belonging and creating specific diasporic practices. Based on a sample of interviews with professional and academic South Asian British citizens in London, in Leicester, and in a number of Northern English cities gendered and generational patterns in terms of local diasporic identities are explored. Apart from multiple cultural belonging, foremost, territorial bonds and notions of group loyalty collapse at a point where temporary migration and settlement alternate in individual biographies.

Keywords

Muslim Woman Legal Profession Muslim Community Interview Partner Northern City 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the editor and the helpful comments of the anonymous referee. The research was funded by the VSB, a Dutch grant, and carried out as a research project of the interdisciplinary research group ‘Inclusive Thinking’ in 2009–2011. I would like to thank particularly Halleh Ghorashi (VU Amsterdam) and James Kennedy (University of Amsterdam) for their generous support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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