Strong Communities for Children: A Community-Wide Approach to Prevention of Child Maltreatment

Chapter
Part of the Child Maltreatment book series (MALT, volume 2)

Abstract

The U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect advocated a neighborhood-based approach to child protection. This strategy’s most extensive application was in Strong Communities for Children, located in a diverse area in northwestern South Carolina. Strong Communities used outreach workers (approximately one per town) to mobilize communities so that all children and parents would be noticed and cared for. In comparison with matched communities and across time, significant changes occurred in community norms (especially in high-need neighborhoods) and in children’s safety, as determined in a random survey of parents and in analyses of archives in health, social services, and education systems. The approach is applicable in diverse communities and probably diverse societies.

Keywords

Child Maltreatment Service Area Child Protection Outreach Worker Comparison Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Colorado School of MedicineDenverUSA

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