Evaluation of Seakeeping Predictions

  • Frederick Stern
  • Hamid Sadat-Hosseini
  • Maysam Mousaviraad
  • Shanti Bhushan
Chapter

Abstract

Test cases related to seakeeping are studied in this chapter including heave and pitch with or without surge motion in regular head waves for KVLCC2 and KCS and wave diffraction and roll-decay with forward speed for DTMB 5415. For seakeeping, the total average error is E = 23 %D, comparable to the average error for previous seakeeping predictions. For resistance, the largest error values are for the 1st harmonic amplitude and phase (34 %D), followed by 0th harmonic amplitude (18 %D) and steady (7 %D). For motions, the largest error values are for the 0th harmonic amplitudes (54 %D), followed by 1st harmonic amplitude and phase (13 %D) and steady (9 %D). The errors for the CFD predictions are similar for the different geometries and wavelengths, the small and large amplitude waves, and for the cases with and without surge motion. The errors are larger for the cases with zero forward speed. Compared with potential flow, CFD showed larger errors for motions for the medium and long wavelengths. For wave diffraction submissions, the large grid size DES simulation has achieved an average error value of less than 10 %D, while for the small grid size URANS simulations the average error is 28 %D. For roll decay submissions, the average error values are 10 %D for resistance and less than 1 %D for roll motions.

Keywords

Coarse Grid Roll Motion Forward Speed Harmonic Amplitude Pitch Moment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgement

The research at Iowa was sponsored by Office of Naval Research under Grant Nos. N00014-01-1-0073 and N00014-06-1-0420 administered by Dr. Patrick Purtell. The authors would like to thank Dr. Dave Kring, Dr. Arthur Reed and Prof. Bob Beck for their helpful comments, especially Prof. Beck who patiently went through several iterations, which clarified our analysis and conclusions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick Stern
    • 1
  • Hamid Sadat-Hosseini
    • 1
  • Maysam Mousaviraad
    • 1
  • Shanti Bhushan
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Iowa and Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research (IIHR)Iowa CityUSA
  2. 2.Mississippi State UniversityStarkvilleUSA

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