The Production of a Safe Neighborhood and the Disciplining of International Mobility

Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Migration book series (IPMI, volume 5)

Abstract

Most of the European Union’s attempts to control and restrict migration concentrate on the EU’s common external border and, in particular, on so-called ‘third states’ beyond this border. This chapter discusses the role of intergovernmental organizations (IGO) that have become important agents in the exterritorialization of EU migration politics. As an inquiry into the mechanisms and implications of IGO- and EU-driven mobility politics, the aim lies in contributing to the growing debate on the 'management' of human mobility and the role of international institutions.

Keywords

European Union Human Trafficking Civil Society Actor Intergovernmental Organization Migration Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political Science, and Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian StudiesCarleton UniversityOttawaCanada

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