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Teacher Professional Development on Mathematical Modelling: Initial Perspectives from Singapore

  • Vince GeigerEmail author
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematical Modelling book series (IPTL)

Abstract

In this chapter, I will provide commentary on the symposium dedicated to teacher professional development on mathematical modelling in Singapore which was based on papers by: Chan, Teacher professional development on mathematical modelling: Conceptions of mathematical modelling; Lee, Initial perspectives from Singapore: Problem posing and task design; and Ng, Teacher professional development on mathematical modelling: Facilitation and scaffolding. Across these three themes emerge – the importance for teachers to understand the nature of mathematical modelling; the need to acknowledge the interconnection between teaching, learning and assessment; and the influence of teacher dispositions toward designing modelling tasks. I conclude this commentary by offering observations on the research designs employed in these studies.

Keywords

Professional Learning Modelling Task Teacher Professional Development High Stake Examination Teacher Professional Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Education QLD | Faculty of EducationAustralian Catholic UniversityBrisbaneAustralia

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