What We Hear

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Brain and Mind book series (SIBM, volume 6)

Abstract

It is widely assumed (and only rarely argued) that the principal objects of hearing are sounds.

Keywords

Sound Source Material Object Tactile Perception Ordinary Object Auditory Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyBucknell UniversityLewisburgUSA

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