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Country-Wide Health Impact Assessment of Airborne Particulate Matter in Estonia

  • Kaisa Kesanurm
  • Erik Teinemaa
  • Marko KaasikEmail author
  • Tanel Tamm
  • Taavi Lai
  • Hans Orru
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security book series (NAPSC)

Abstract

This study is aimed to assess the health impacts of outdoor PM2.5 concentrations to entire population of Estonia. As the air quality monitoring network in Estonia is rather sparse (six urban, three rural and a few industrial sites), the exposure assessment was based on long-term modelling, controlled by monitoring data from existing stations. The model runs were performed with IairViro modelling system, including the Eulerian MATCH model for country-wide run with 5 km grid resolution and AirViro urban model with 200 m grid resolution for five major cities. The database of pollution sources includes industrial, transport and domestic heating emissions. The average annual PM2.5 concentrations were found 7–9 μg/m3 at most of rural and in 9–13 μg/m3 typically at urban areas, up to 30 μg/m3 in some parts of capital city Tallinn. To estimate the health risks, the base-line national health statistics and exposure-response coefficients from previous epidemiological studies (ACS, APHEIS), were applied. It was found that on average 600 (CI 95 % 155–1,061) premature deaths per year are caused by PM2.5 pollution in Estonia, which has population nearly 1.3 million. On average 5 months of life are lost, maximum 14 months in some parts of Tallinn. About 900 additional hospitalizations due to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases occur per year.

Keywords

PM Health impact MATCH-model 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study is funded by Estonian Ministry of Environment, Estonian Centre of Environmental Investments, and Estonian National Targeted Financing Project SF0180038s08.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaisa Kesanurm
    • 1
    • 2
  • Erik Teinemaa
    • 2
  • Marko Kaasik
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tanel Tamm
    • 3
  • Taavi Lai
    • 4
  • Hans Orru
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of PhysicsUniversity of TartuTartuEstonia
  2. 2.Estonian Environmental Research CentreTallinnEstonia
  3. 3.Institute of Ecology and Earth SciencesUniversity of TartuTartuEstonia
  4. 4.Department of Public HealthUniversity of TartuTartuEstonia

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