Assumptions: Where Are We?

  • Lois McFadyen Christensen
  • Jerry Aldridge
Chapter

Abstract

Every early childhood and elementary educator operates in life from a set of assumptions. This chapter offers ways for readers to consider the unrecognized and unexamined aspects of these assumptions. Certain forms of knowledge are valued more than others in schools. For example, presently science and math are more valued than music and the arts. Also, school knowledge belongs to a particular group of people. Children and families who do not have school knowledge are at a disadvantage. Finally, people in power exercise their position to maintain dominance to keep those places in society. Early childhood and elementary educators are encouraged to deconstruct long-held assumptions. What can educators do to make a difference in their classrooms and communities when these three assumptions of critical pedagogy are pervasive in the school systems in which they teach?

Keywords

School System Elementary Teacher Teacher Candidate Elementary Educator Classroom Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lois McFadyen Christensen
    • 1
  • Jerry Aldridge
    • 2
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of AlabamaBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.OMEP Representative to UN/UNICEF North American OMEP Representative to OASNew YorkUSA

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