Beyond GIS: Geospatial Technologies and the Future of History

Chapter

Abstract

GIS is a powerful technology with useful but limited application to history as practiced by most historians, appealing primarily to scholars who employ quantitative data and methods. But the spatial turn, especially as it is influenced by Web 2.0 technologies and practices, has resulted in a new hybridization of geo-spatial technologies that promise to reshape the discipline of history in ways reflective of postmodern concerns and epistemologies. In this new form, geo-spatial technologies are better equipped to construct the spatial narratives and deep maps that permit, indeed encourage, the sort of reflexive, recursive, and collaborative environments that will mark history in the future.

Keywords

Virtual Reality Geographic Information System Humanity Scholar Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis Spatial Humanity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Polis CenterIndiana University – Purdue University IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA

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