International Perspectives for Young Children with Special Needs

Chapter
Part of the Educating the Young Child book series (EDYC, volume 5)

Abstract

This chapter looks at how services for young children with special needs are being addressed from an international perspective of early childhood special education and provide an overview of influential international initiatives impacting special education services including the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Examples of changes resulting from such initiatives are described for China and Guatemala. Next, differences in cultural belief and value systems and how they influence policies and services related to children with special needs are discussed. Results from two international studies using the Association for Childhood Education International Global Guidelines Assessment are then described with a focus on services for young children with special needs. Implications for future policy decisions conclude the chapter.

Keywords

Early Childhood Education Special Education Service Early Childhood Special Education High Quality Early Childhood United Nations International Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Belinda Hardin
    • 1
  • Hsuan-Fang Hung
    • 2
  • Mariana Mereoiu
    • 3
  1. 1.Specialized Education Services DepartmentUniversity of North CarolinaGreensboroUSA
  2. 2.National Taiwan UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.Bowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA

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