In Situ Techniques for the Characterisation of Rendering Mortars

  • Ana Paula Ferreira Pinto
  • Rita Nogueira
  • Augusto Gomes
Conference paper
Part of the RILEM Bookseries book series (RILEM, volume 7)

Abstract

Compressive strength, porosity and two “in situ” techniques (ultrasonic velocity and rebound hardness test) are used for the characterisation of several aerial, hydraulic lime-based and cement-based mortars. Prismatic specimens and mortars applied as a brick render are used for the characterisation. A comparative analysis of the “in situ” test results and compressive strength is performed and the relationship between porosity and ultrasound velocity is analysed. A satisfactory relationship between the porosity and ultrasound velocity values is found and this indicates the possibility of estimating porosity from ultrasound velocity. The relationship between ultrasound velocity, rebound values and compressive strength emphasizes the potential of the “in situ” test methods for characterisation of mechanical properties of mortars.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Cement Mortar Ultrasound Velocity Prismatic Specimen Flow Table 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the Foundation for Science and Technology through the funding allocated to ICIST, Institute of Structural Engineering, Planning and Construction. They are also grateful to C. Agostinho, I. Santos, A. Fernandes, B. Mendonça, A. Martins, N. Cruz and P. Lima for their collaboration in the experimental work within the scope of their MSc dissertations.

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Paula Ferreira Pinto
    • 1
  • Rita Nogueira
    • 1
  • Augusto Gomes
    • 1
  1. 1.UTL-Instituto Superior Técnico – ICISTLisbonPortugal

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