VIA Character Strengths: Research and Practice (The First 10 Years)

Part of the Cross-Cultural Advancements in Positive Psychology book series (CAPP, volume 3)

Abstract

The VIA Classification is a widely used framework for helping individuals discover, explore, and use those qualities that are strongest in them – their character strengths. The VIA Inventory of Strengths is an accessible and widely used assessment instrument that measures 24 universally valued strengths. Research has found a number of important links between these character strengths and valued outcomes (e.g., life satisfaction, achievement). The practice of character strengths has not been studied as extensively; however, a number of practices, strength-based models, and applications are emerging with good potential.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.VIA Institute on CharacterCincinnatiUSA

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