Molybdate Affects Sulfate Acquisition in Brassica juncea Plants

  • Mario Malagoli
  • Michela Schiavon
  • Markus Wirtz
  • Ruediger Hell
  • Elizabeth A. H. Pilon-Smits
  • Sara Trevisan
  • Silvia Quaggiotti
Conference paper
Part of the Proceedings of the International Plant Sulfur Workshop book series (PIPSW, volume 1)

Abstract

In the last years Brassica juncea plants have been studied and utilized for heavy metal phytoremediation. In the present study plants of Brassica juncea were exposed for 24 h to 200 μM molybdate, and the interaction between molybdate and sulfate was evaluated. The presence of Mo in the medium affected the biomass of the plants. In particular, the effect was evident in roots, which appeared to be the primary target of molybdenum toxicity. In the plants supplied with Mo, the S content was reduced consistently with the decline of the sulfate uptake rates. However, the transcript level of the sulfate transporter BjSultr2;1 in roots was unchanged, while Mo treatment clearly enhanced the MOT1 transcript accumulation. The content of glutathione (GSH) decreased in roots and leaves of plants exposed to Mo, likely due to the competition of molybdate with sulfate for the access to the sulfur metabolic pathway.

Keywords

Brassica Juncea Aerate Nutrient Solution Sulfate Permease Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis Affect Plant Biomass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mario Malagoli
    • 1
  • Michela Schiavon
    • 1
  • Markus Wirtz
    • 2
  • Ruediger Hell
    • 2
  • Elizabeth A. H. Pilon-Smits
    • 3
  • Sara Trevisan
    • 1
  • Silvia Quaggiotti
    • 1
  1. 1.DAFNAEUniversity of PadovaLegnaroItaly
  2. 2.Centre for Organismal StudiesUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Biology DepartmentColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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