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Parental Leave Policies, Gender Equity and Family Well-Being in Europe: A Comparative Perspective

  • Karin WallEmail author
  • Anna Escobedo
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 49)

Abstract

This chapter explores the diversity of leave policy models in contemporary European society. Seven empirically based ideal types are identified by looking at data for the 22 countries on leave systems, early childhood services and maternal and couples’ employment patterns. We address the complex interplay between leave systems and work-family, gender and welfare regimes. The analysis reveals three sets of conclusions, which relate to convergence and divergence in care leave policies across Europe, leave generosity and its linkages to gender equity and family well-being.

Keywords

Gender Equality Parental Leave Maternity Leave Gender Equity Maternal Employment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Social SciencesUniversity of LisbonLisbonPortugal
  2. 2.Department of Sociology and Organisational AnalysisUniversity of BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain

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