Preservice Teaching and Pedagogies of Transformation

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter begins with an overview of some of the persistent problems in teacher education as a context for understanding contemporary discussions about teacher education and social change. The chapter goes on to describe 20 years of efforts to infuse education for sustainable development (ESD) into the preservice program at York University in Toronto, Canada. It offers an analysis of why some initiatives proved more successful than others and concludes by asking what a garden-based approach might teach us about transforming the theory and practice of our work as teacher educators.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationYork UniversityTorontoCanada

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