Advertisement

The Perils of Success: Clark Kerr and the Master Plan for Higher Education

  • Patrick M. Callan
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education Dynamics book series (HEDY, volume 38)

Abstract

The 1960 California Master Plan for Higher Education was one of Clark Kerr’s most significant achievements. The Plan reflected Kerr’s vision of the role of higher education in mid-twentieth century America and his insights into California’s changing needs and aspirations. Its development and adoption required pragmatism and political skill. Its implementation propelled California higher education to national and international prominence. But as demographic, economic and educational circumstances changed, Kerr’s visionary blueprint of 1960 and its iconic status have impeded its adaptation to the needs of contemporary California.

Keywords

High Education Community College High School Graduate Master Plan College Enrollment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Bracco, K. R., & Callan, P. M. (2002). Competition and collaboration in California higher education. San Jose: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education.Google Scholar
  2. Breneman, D. W., Estrada, L. F., & Hayward, G. C. (1995). Tidal wave II, an evaluation of enrollment projections for California higher education. San Jose: California Higher Education Policy Center.Google Scholar
  3. Brown, R. S., & Neimi, D. N. (2007). Investigating the alignment of high school and community college tests in California. San Jose: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education.Google Scholar
  4. California Community Colleges, Academic Senate Basic Skills Committee. (2003–2004). Issues in basic skills assessment and placement in the California Community Colleges. http://www.asccc.org/Publications/Papers/Downloads/PDFs/BasicSkillsIsuesAssessment.pdf. Accessed 30 Apr 2008. Adopted Fall 2004.
  5. California Department of Education. National assessment education progress reports for California. http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/nr/caresults.asp. Accessed 20 Mar 2008.
  6. California Department of Finance. (1999–2007). Governor’s proposed budget. Sacramento, CA. http://www.dof.ca.gov/budget/historical_ebudgets/
  7. California Higher Education Policy Center. (1993, Spring). An interview with Clark Kerr. CrossTalk. San Jose.Google Scholar
  8. California Higher Education Policy Center. (1997). A promise worth keeping, a special Roundtable examines the challenge of renewing California’s historic commitment to access and quality. San Jose.Google Scholar
  9. California Higher Education Policy Center. (1997). Financing the California master plan: data base of public finance for higher education in California 1958/59 to 1996/97. San Jose.Google Scholar
  10. California Postsecondary Education Commission. (2006). Fiscal profiles, commission report 06–13. Sacramento.Google Scholar
  11. California Postsecondary Education Commission. (2010, December). Fiscal profiles, report 10–21. Sacramento.Google Scholar
  12. California Postsecondary Education Commission. Custom data reports. Enrollment Full Year Transfers to Public Universities. http://www.cpec.ca.gov/OnLineData/SelectFinalOptions.asp. Accessed 20 Aug 2011.
  13. California State University Analytic Studies. (2007). Proficiency reports of students entering the CSU system. http://www.asd.calstate.edu/performance/combo/2007/Combo_Prof_Sys_fall2007.htm. Accessed 30 Apr 2008.
  14. California State University. Proficiency reports of students entering the CSU System. http:www.asd.calstate.edu/performance/proficiency.shtml. Accessed 19 Aug 2011.
  15. Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. (1932). State higher education in California. Sacramento: California State Printing Office.Google Scholar
  16. Douglass, J. A. (2000). The California idea and American higher education. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  17. EdSource. (2008–2009). Staff-per-pupil ratios in California. http://www.edsource.org/data_StaffPupilRatios08-09.html. Accessed 19 Aug 2011.
  18. Governor’s Committee on Educational Excellence. (2007). Students first, renewing hope for California’s future. Sacramento. http://everychildprepared.org/docs/summary.pdf
  19. Johnson, H. P, & Reed, D. (2007). Can California import enough college graduates to meet workforce needs? Public Policy Institute of California, San Francisco. California Counts 8(4).Google Scholar
  20. Jones, D. (2006). State shortfalls projected to continue despite economic gains. Policy Alert. San Jose: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education.Google Scholar
  21. Kerr, C. (1992). The California master plan of 1960 for higher education: An ex ante view. In S. Rothblatt (Ed.), The OECD, the master plan and the California dream, a Berkeley conversation. Berkeley: Center for Studies in Higher Education, University of California.Google Scholar
  22. Kerr, C. (1994). Preserving the master plan. San Jose: California Higher Education Policy Center.Google Scholar
  23. Kerr, C. (2003). The gold and the blue, a personal memoir of the University of California, 1949–1976 (Academic triumphs, Vol. I). Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  24. Martinez, M., & Nodine, T. (1997). California: Financing higher education amid policy drift. In P. M. Callan & J. E. Finney (Eds.), Public and private financing of higher education. Phoenix: ACE/Oryx Press.Google Scholar
  25. Moore, C., Offenstein, J., & Shulock, N. (2011). Consequences of neglect: Performance trends in California higher education. Sacramento: Institute for Higher Education Leadership and Policy.Google Scholar
  26. National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, Information Center. http:///higheredinfo.org/dbrowser/index.php?submeasure=85year=2005level=nationmode=datastate=0. Accessed 5 May 2008.Google Scholar
  27. National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. (2006). Projected drop in income for California most severe in U.S. Policy Alert Supplement. San Jose. http://www.highereducation.org/reports/pa_shortfalls/index.shtml
  28. National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. (2008). Measuring up 2008: The state and national report card on higher education. California. San Jose. http://measuringup2008.highereducation.org/
  29. National Education Association, NEA Research. (2010, December). Rankings & estimates, rankings of the states 2010 and estimates of school statistics 2011. http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/NEA_Rankings_andEstimates010711.pdf. Accessed 18 Aug 2011.
  30. Pickens, W. H. (1999). The California experience: The segmented approach. In G. Gaither (Ed.), The multicampus system, perspectives on practice and prospects. Sterling: Stylus Publishing.Google Scholar
  31. Richardson, R. C., Jr., Bracco, K. R., Callan, P. M., & Finney, J. (1999). Designing higher education for a new century. Phoenix: ACE/Oryx Press.Google Scholar
  32. Richardson, R. C., Jr., & Martinez, M. (2009). Policy and performance in American higher education. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press.Google Scholar
  33. Rothblatt, S. (2004, Winter). Clark Kerr. National CrossTalk. San Jose: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education.Google Scholar
  34. Rothblatt, S. (2007). Education’s abiding moral dilemma, merit and worth in the cross-Atlantic democracies, 1800–2006. Oxford: Symposium Books.Google Scholar
  35. Schrag, P. (1999). Paradise lost, California’s experience, America’s future. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  36. Schrag, P. (2006). California, America’s high stakes experiment. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  37. Shulock, N. (2004). The impact of recent budget reductions and enrollment pressures on access and quality. In G. C. Hayward, D. P. Jones, A. C. McGuiness Jr., & A. Timar (Eds.), Ensuring access with quality to California’s community colleges. San Jose: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education.Google Scholar
  38. Zumeta, W., & Frankle, D. (2007). California community colleges: Making them stronger and more affordable. San Jose: National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Higher Education Policy InstituteSan JoseUSA

Personalised recommendations