Political Economy and Social Justice in the US-Mexico Border Region

Chapter

Abstract

Political economy is the study of power in human affairs, including politics, economics, and ideology. Three border processes are examined in terms of these three elements. They are border crossing processes, border-reinforcing ones, and, a third category crucial to borders, uneven and combined relations. The latter involve both connections and also the maintenance or reinforcement of differentiation. The border is a subordinate region in the political economy of North America, though also a crucial point of production and exchange due to combined and uneven relations. This is explored through application of the concept of dependency to politics, economics, and ideas. Examples are taken from the domains of migration, smuggling, and industrialization, and the topic of regulated, unequal mobility is explored. Finally, the challenge and possibilities for social justice struggles of this highly unequal scenario of political economy are explored.

Keywords

Political Economy Border Region Border City Border Enforcement Border Trade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyUniversity of Texas at El PasoEl PasoUSA

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