Leaf-Eating Lepidoptera in North American Vineyards

Chapter

Abstract

Leaf eating Lepidoptera commonly found in North American vineyards include four species. Two of these, the grape leaffolder, Desmia funeralis (Hbner) (Pyralidae) and the western grape leaf skeletonizer, Harrisina brillians Barnes McDunnough (Zygaenidae), are considered major pests. A fifth species, the omnivorous leafroller Platynota stultana Walsingham (Tortricidae), can be found webbing leaves but primary damage is through direct feeding on flowers and berries that results in secondary infection of bunch rot organisms. Damage to leaves by this insect is of no economic importance. Omnivorous leafroller is a major grape pest of western United States. Less common defoliating lepidopterans include the Achemon sphinx moth, Eumorpha achemon (Drury) (Sphingidae) and the whitelined sphinx, Hyles lineata (F.) (Sphingidae).

Keywords

Abdominal Segment Hind Wing Silk Gland Pheromone Trap Young Larva 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension CenterUniversity of CaliforniaParlierUSA
  2. 2.Division of Agriculture and Natural ResourcesUniversity of CaliforniaFresnoUSA

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