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The Development of Bioethics in the United States: An Introduction

  • Jeremy R. Garrett
  • Fabrice Jotterand
  • D. Christopher Ralston
Chapter
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 115)

Abstract

In the last four decades bioethics has experienced tremendous development, which can be attributed to various factors. First, advances in the biomedical sciences and biotechnology increasingly raise ethical, legal, and social issues that concern society at large. The complexity of the current health care system and the development of powerful biotechnologies necessitate the critical and interdisciplinary analysis that bioethics can provide. Second, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, which accredits health care organizations in the United States, requires hospitals to have a mechanism that offers clinical ethics consultations (Lo 2005, 111), and funding agencies expect the inclusion of bioethics components in research protocols. Finally, there is a need for bioethics education for health care professionals (physicians, nurses, chaplains, social workers, administrators, etc.) seeking advancement, IRB/Hospital Ethics Committee members working on health policies/ethics programs, and students seeking to include bioethics in their primary training or to pursue a career in bioethics.

Keywords

Medical Ethic Moral Philosophy Biomedical Science Ethic Consultation Moral Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeremy R. Garrett
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fabrice Jotterand
    • 3
    • 4
  • D. Christopher Ralston
    • 5
  1. 1.Children’s Mercy Bioethics CenterChildren’s Mercy HospitalKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Pediatrics, Department of PhilosophyUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityKansas CityUSA
  3. 3.Institute for Biomedical EthicsUniversity of BaselBaselSwitzerland
  4. 4.Department of Philosophy and HumanitiesUniversity of Texas ArlingtonArlingtonUSA
  5. 5.Department of PhilosophyRice UniversityHoustonUSA

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