ICT Use with Chinese Characteristics

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs)—limited to mobile phone and Internet use—in contemporary China. Based on fieldwork undertaken since 2003 in Guangzhou and Beijing, this chapter focuses on the relationship between society and technology in the Chinese cultural context. An analysis of the data on ICT use in China shows how Chinese cultural traits and the speed of the ICT evolution in China have combined to bring about a unique cyber experience. This analysis may be helpful to other scholars who wish to compare the impact of ICTs in various cultures or who are interested in discovering how Mainland China is going cyber.

Keywords

Mobile Phone Migrant Worker Short Message Service Digital Divide Private Sphere 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Applied Social SciencesThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong KongChina
  2. 2.Department of SociologyHong Kong Shue Yan UniversityHong KongChina

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