Development and Future of Insect Conservation in Japan

Chapter

Abstract

Japan is located at the eastern edge of the Eurasian Continent, and is an island nation composed of four large islands—Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu—and a large number of small islands. Although the Japanese Archipelago is relatively small (with the total area of land approximately 380,000 km2 ), the climate ranges from subtropical to the Frigid Zone, with a temperate zone that has four distinct seasons at the centre; the Japanese Archipelago is approximately 3,000 km from north to south, extending from latitude about 45° N to about 20° N. Moreover, Japan is a volcanic country, and mountain ranges run in all directions on each island. There are numerous mountains with various heights including the highest mountain, Mt. Fuji (3,776 m).

Keywords

Invasive Alien Species Ogasawara Island Civic Group Diving Beetle Stag Beetle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Araya K (2002) Alien rhinoceros and stag beetles. In: Ecological Society of Japan (ed) Handbook of alien species in Japan. Chijinshokan Publishing Co. Ltd., Tokyo, pp 158–159 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  2. Araya K (2005) Current topics of exotic rhinoceros and stag beetles. Nat Insect 40(4):27–32 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  3. Environmental Agency Japan (1991a) Threatened wildlife of Japan, Red Data Book, Vertebrata. Japan Wildlife Research Center, Tokyo, 272pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  4. Environmental Agency Japan (1991b) Threatened wildlife of Japan, Red Data Book, Invertebrata. Japan Wildlife Research Center, Tokyo, 272pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  5. Fukui J (2010) Conservation of the endangered dragonfly, Libellula angelina, in Okegaya pond, Iwata city. In: Ishii M (ed) Decline and conservation of insects in Japan. Hokuryukan Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 135–142 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  6. Gohkon K (2010) Decline of coastal hymenopterans due to reduction of natural sandy beach. In: Ishii M (ed) Decline and conservation of insects in Japan. Hokuryukan Publishing Co, Tokyo, pp 174–188 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  7. Goka K, Kojima H (2003) Inter-species hybridization and genetic introgression caused by commercialization of stag beetles. Nat Insect 38(3):6–12 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  8. Habu N (1986) Immigrant insects in Ogasawara Islands, history of biota in the oceanic islands. In: Kiritani K (ed) Insects of Japan, ecology on invasion and disturbance. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, pp 107–114 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  9. Hara S (1996) Do we prevent the natural monument papilionid, Luehdorfia japonica, around Mt. Ishizare from inter-population hybridization and genetic introgression. Endangered wildlife from the perspective of Red Data List of the Kanagawa prefecture, Kanagawa Prefecture Museum of Natural History, pp 94–96 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  10. Hasegawa J (2009) Harmful deer as a factor of insect’s declining. Nat Insect 44(5):44–47 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  11. Hirowatari T, Ishii M, Fujiwara S (1996) Species diversity of butterflies in the coppice of Mt. Mikusa. In: Ae SA, Hirowatari T, Ishii M, Brower LP (eds) Decline and conservation of butterflies in Japan III. Lepidopterological Society of Japan, Osaka, pp 92–98Google Scholar
  12. Hiura I (1973) Butterflies flying over the sea. Aokishobo, Co. Ltd, Tokyo, p 200 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  13. Ichikawa N (2009) Habitat conditions of Japanese pond insects in 2008. Nat Insect 44(1):2–4 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  14. Ichikawa N (2010) Decline and conservation of aquatic insects in Japan. In: Ishii M (ed) Decline and conservation of insects in Japan. Hokuryukan Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 68–80 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  15. Inoue Y, Kon M (2006) Seasonal prevalence of an alien papilionid, Sericinus montela, and a native papilionid, Atrophaneura alcinous, on the bank of the Kizu River, Kyoto prefecture. Nat Insect 41(13):33–37 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  16. Ishii M (1996) Decline and conservation of butterflies in Japan. In: Ae SA, Hirowatari T, Ishii M, Brower LP (eds) Decline and conservation of butterflies in Japan III. Lepidopterological Society of Japan, Osaka, pp 157–167Google Scholar
  17. Ishii M (2003) Conservation of species. In: Mitsuhashi J (ed) Encyclopedia of entomology. Asakurashoten Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 1087–1102 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  18. Ishii M (2005) Insects on Red Data List showing the status of nature in Japan. Nat Insect 40(14):2–9. (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  19. Ishii M (2009) Importance of the Satoyama landscapes for conservation of biodiversity. In: Mano T, Fujii H (eds) Decline and conservation of butterflies and moths in Japan VIII. Lepidopterological Society of Japan, Tokyo, pp 3–11 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  20. Ishii M, Hirowatari T, Fujiwara S (1995) Species diversity of butterfly communities in Mt. Mikusa Coppice for Zephyrus. Jpn J Environ Zool Entomol 7:134–146 (in Japanese with English Summary)Google Scholar
  21. Ishii M, Ohtani T, Johki Y (1996–1998) Encyclopedia of animals in Japan, vol 8–10. Heibonsha Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  22. Ishii M, Ishii T, Hirowatari T (2003) Maintenance of habitat for the Zephyrus butterflies by coppice management in Mt Mikusa, northern Osaka. Bull Kansai Organ Nat Conserv 24:75–85 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  23. Ito F (2006) Effects of invasive ants on native organisms. Nat Insect 41(13):10–13 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  24. Iwami J, Kamata K, Shintani T, Nakamura Y, Nakamoto M (2006) Conservation action for the Scotosia checkerspot, Melitaea scotosia. Nat Insect 41(3):10–15 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  25. Iwano H (2005) On the distribution of a nymphalid butterfly, Hestina assimilis, in Kanagawa prefecture. Nat Insect 40(4):6–8 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  26. Iwano H (2010) Expansion of alien butterflies and risks to native ecosystems. In: Ishii M (ed) Decline and conservation of insects in Japan. Hokuryukan Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 248–258 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  27. Karube H (2005) Impact on the dragonflies by ‘Black Bass’. Nat Insect 40(6):22–25 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  28. Karube H (2006) Endangered situation of the endemic insect fauna on the Ogasawara islands due to alien species. Nat Insect 41(13):14–21 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  29. Kiritani K (1999) Exotic insects in Japan. Entomol Sci 1:291–298Google Scholar
  30. Kishimoto K (2010) Conservation in Ogasawara Islands. In: Ishii M (ed) Decline and conservation of insects in Japan. Hokuryukan Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 277–294 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  31. Kohama T (2002) Alien rhinoceros beetles and stag beetles. In: Ecological Society of Japan (ed) Handbook of alien species in Japan. Chijinshokan Publishing Co. Ltd. 250–251 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  32. Matsumoto K (2004) The papilionid, Luehdorfia japonica, in southern Kanto district. J Forest Res 40:53–60 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  33. Ministry of the Environment (ed) (2006) Threatened wildlife of Japan, Red Data Book, vol 5, 2nd edn, Insecta. Japan Wildlife Research Center, Tokyo, 246pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  34. Morimoto K (2006) An overview of insects. In: Ministry of the Environment (ed) Threatened wildlife of Japan, Red Data Book, vol 5, 2nd edn, Insecta. Japan Wildlife Research Center, Tokyo, pp 22–23 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  35. Moriyama H (1998) Paddy fields as habitats for a variety of wildlife. In: National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences (ed) Biological diversity in ecosystem of paddy field. Yokendo Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 35–61 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  36. Murasugi S (1998) Introduction to nature conservation. Nature Conservation (426):9 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  37. Nakamura Y (2011) Conservation of butterflies in Japan: status, actions and strategy. J Insect Conserv 15:5–22CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Nanba M (2009) Ecology and conservation of Melitaea protomedia in Ombara highland, Okayama prefecture. In: Mano T, Fujii H (eds) Decline and conservation of butterflies and moths in Japan VIII. Lepidopterological Society of Japan, Tokyo, pp 39–48 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  39. Nature Conservation Society of Japan (2005) Nature and conservation of Satoyama from the ­perspective of ecology. Kohdansha Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  40. Nature Conservation Society of Japan and World Wildlife Fund for Nature Japan (1989) Status quo of plant species important for conservation in Japan. Nature Conservation Society of Japan, Tokyo, 320pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  41. Nishihara S (2009) Present situation and conservation of diving beetle Dytiscus sharpi. Nat Insect 44(1):25–29 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  42. Nishihara S (2010) Status quo and conservation of diving beetles in Japan. In: Ishii M (ed) Decline and conservation of insects in Japan. Hokuryukan Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 151–162 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  43. Nishihara S, Karube H (2009) South Kantou district where the insects of the ponds and rice ­paddies disappeared. Nat Insect 44(1):13–20 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  44. Nishinaka Y, Ishii M (2006) Effects of experimental mowing on species diversity and assemblage structure of butterflies in the coppice of Mt. Mikusa, northern Osaka, central Japan. Trans Lepidopt Soc Japan 57(3):202–216Google Scholar
  45. Nishinaka Y, Ishii M (2007) Mosaic of various seral stages of vegetation in the Satoyama, the traditional rural landscape of Japan as an important habitat for butterflies. Trans Lepidopt Soc Japan 58(1):69–90Google Scholar
  46. Ohba N (1996) Village for fireflies. Floebel-kan Co. Ltd, Tokyo, 55pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  47. Ohba N (2006) Introduction of various geographical strains of the firefly, Luciola cruciata, to the local population may cause problems of the genetic diversity. Nat Insect 41(13):27–32 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  48. Parmesan C (1996) Climate and species range. Nature 382:765–766CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Sakuratani Y, Kanno K (2003) Seasonal prevalence of an alien papilionid, Sericinus montela, on the bank of the Kizu River, Kyoto prefecture – comparison with a native papilionid, Atrophaneura alcinous. In: Sunose T, Eda K (eds) Decline and conservation of butterflies in Japan V. Lepidopterological Society of Japan, Tokyo, pp 181–184 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  50. Sasaki K (1993) Exploring the underlying of Japanese cultures, deciduous- and evergreen-forest cultures. NHK Publishing Co., Ltd, Tokyo, p 253 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  51. Satoh A (2008) The current status and conservation of coastal tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae). Jpn J Conserv Ecol 13:103–110 (in Japanese with English Summary)Google Scholar
  52. Sugimura M (2005) Natural park for dragonflies of Shimanto city. In: Inoue K and Miyatake Y (eds) How to study dragonflies and damselflies. Japanese Society for Environmental Zoology and Entomology, Osaka, pp 243–248 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  53. Sugimura M, Ichii H (1990) Welcome to the dragonfly kingdom. Iwanamishoten Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, 204 pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  54. Sugiyama T (2000) Invasion of Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, into Hiroshima prefecture, Japan. Jpn J Appl Entomol Zool 44:127–129CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Suzuki H, Sato Y, Ohba N (2002) Gene diversity and geographic differentiation in mitochondrial DNA of the Genji firefly, Luciola cruciata (Coleoptera: Lampyridae). Mol Phylogenet Evol 22:193–205PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Takakuwa M (2004) Analytic report on morphological characters of a papilionid butterfly Luehdorfia japonica occurring on Ishizare-yama of the Tanzawa-area, with special reference to the related local populations. Bull Kanagawa Pref Mus (Nat Sci) 33:19–53 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  57. Tanikawa T, Ishii M (2010) Climatic condition in habitats of the univoltine papilionid, Luehdorfia japonica. Nat Insect 45(6):4–7 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  58. Terayama M (2002) Problems of the introduced ants: cases of the tropical fire ant and the Argentine ant. Nat Insect 37(3):16–19 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  59. Terayama M (2005) The consequence of the Argentine ant and the fire ants. Nat Insect 40(4):22–23 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  60. Ueda T (2007) Current status and conservation of dragonflies in Satoyama. Abstract of the 19th annual meeting of Jpn Soc Environ Zool Entomol: 4–5 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  61. Watanabe M, Matsu’ura S, Fukaya M (2008) Changes in distribution and abundance of the endangered damselfly Mortonagrion hirosei Asahina (Zygoptera: Coenagrionidae) in a reed community artificially established for its conservation. J Insect Conserv 12:663–670CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Yamada F (2000) Woodland ecosystem and biological diversity. In: Udagawa T (ed) Rural area and biodiversity. Ieno-hikari Association, Tokyo, pp 78–99 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  63. Yamada F (2005) Satoyama as a habitat of mammalians. In: Nature Conservation Society of Japan (ed) Nature and conservation of Satoyama from the perspective of ecology. Kohdansha Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 118–123 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  64. Yokoyama J (2010) Influence of alien bumble bees on native ecosystems and measures against them. In: Ishii M (ed) Decline and conservation of insects in Japan. Hokuryukan Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, pp 259–267 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  65. Yokoyama J, Nakajima M (2005) Present status of range expansion of naturalized bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (Linnaeus), in Japan. Nat Insect 40(4):24–26 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  66. Yorimitsu R (2011) The shika deer and Japanese forests. Tsukijishokan Publishing Co. Ltd, Tokyo, 226pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  67. Yoshida M (2007) Nature conservation – ecology and sociology. Chijinshokan Co. Ltd, Tokyo, 151pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Entomological Laboratory, Graduate School of Life and Environmental SciencesOsaka Prefecture UniversitySakaiJapan
  2. 2.Japan Butterfly Conservation SocietyTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations