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Flows of Faith pp 183-200 | Cite as

The New Testament Church and Mount Zion in Taiwan

  • Paul J. Farrelly
Chapter

Abstract

Members of the New Testament Church (NTC) led by Elijah Hong, “God’s Chosen Prophet”, believe that God has forsaken the traditional Mount Zion in Israel and that the new Mount Zion in Taiwan is imbued with the spiritual significance and power that the old mountain once had. Mount Zion is both a pilgrimage destination and nature-based utopian community of several hundred adherents, serving as an Eden-like sanctuary and as the setting for the impending Tribulation. The NTC’s theology, as manifested in Mount Zion and the objects on it, is a curious blend of Pentecostal Protestantism and Chinese religiosity.

Keywords

Mount Zion in Israel New Testament Church Elijah Hong NTC’s theology Eden-like sanctuary Pentecostal Protestantism Chinese religiosity. 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian Centre on China in the World ANU College of Asia & the PacificThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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