Towards a Philosophy of Lifelong Learning

Chapter
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 26)

Abstract

In the thinking and activities of those working in educating institutions these days, there is always so much to do connected with the realities of the financing, staffing, delivering and evaluating educational programmes that there seems little time to concentrate on anything else. It is not surprising therefore to find that questions of a more profound kind are generally put to one side, either to await those rare opportunities when there will be an opportunity for more serious reflection or to consign such matters to the advice of ‘experts’ or ‘theorists’ whose time can be given over to such matters, separate and aside from the ‘real’ problems. This is particularly so with philosophical questions. In this chapter, we hope to show that attention to the philosophical questions that are part and parcel of thinking about lifelong learning is not only a crucial and indispensable element of the framework within which lifelong learning programmes and activities are conceived and articulated, but also that the conclusions that are reached as a result of philosophical enquiries have practical implications for developing programmes, curricula and activities of a lifelong learning character.

Keywords

Lifelong Learning Liberal Education Learning Gain Learning Society Educational Provision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This is a revised and updated version of the chapter ‘Towards a Philosophy of Lifelong Learning’ published in the first edition of The International Handbook of Lifelong Learning. It also draws on the book by Chapman, J.D. and Aspin, D.N., The School, the Community and Lifelong Learning (1997) Cassell, London. Readers are encouraged to consult that publication for a more extensive discussion of issues raised in this chapter.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationAustralian Catholic UniversityFitzroy MDCAustralia

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