Spiritual Life in Modern Japan: Understanding Religion in Everyday Life

  • Andrea Molle
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Japan, where religion is conceived differently in many ways from in the West – even though economically Japan stands with the West. His major emphasis is to examine practice at the individual level rather than to focus on historic institutionalized macro traditions. He offers a variety of examples to substantiate the argument that scholars study Japanese religion neither in historically framed contexts nor in a context of globalized “spirituality,” but rather as a uniquely Japanese comprehensive spiritual attitude as it is actually lived and experienced in Japanese peoples’ everyday lives.

Keywords

Religious Organization Spiritual Practice National Team Soccer Ball Religious Pluralism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Molle
    • 1
  1. 1.Chapman UniversityOrangeUSA

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