Towards responsible use of cognitive-enhancing drugs by the healthy

  • Henry Greely
  • Barbara Sahakian
  • John Harris
  • Ronald C. Kessler
  • Michael Gazzaniga
  • Philip Campbell
  • Martha J. Farah
Chapter
Part of the Yearbook of Nanotechnology in Society book series (YNTS, volume 3)

Abstract

Today, on university campuses around the world, students are striking deals to buy and sell prescription drugs such as Adderall and Ritalin — not to get high, but to get higher grades, to provide an edge over their fellow students or to increase in some measurable way their capacity for learning. These transactions are crimes in the United States, punishable by prison.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry Greely
    • 1
  • Barbara Sahakian
    • 2
  • John Harris
    • 3
  • Ronald C. Kessler
    • 4
  • Michael Gazzaniga
    • 5
  • Philip Campbell
    • 6
  • Martha J. Farah
    • 7
  1. 1.Stanford Law School, Crown QuadrangleStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Cambridge, MRC/Wellcome Trust Behavioural and Clinical, Neuroscience InstituteCambridgeUK
  3. 3.Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation, and Wellcome Strategic Programme in The Human Body, its Scope, Limits and FutureUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK
  4. 4.Department of Health Care PolicyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  5. 5.Sage Center for the Study of MindUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA
  6. 6.NatureLondonUK
  7. 7.Center for Cognitive NeuroscienceUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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