Solitary Communities: Disconnecting from the Common Good

Chapter

Abstract

A community is a place to become self-fulfilled, so in an age of self-interest we take community with us wherever we go. Community is no longer based on locale, but it is a product of our interactions. Technology enables us to connect and disconnect with people in a world of matrixed relationships.

Keywords

Common Good Life Change Rigid Boundary Sustainable Community Healthy City 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyNorthern Arizona UniversityFlagstaffUSA

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