Sustaining School and Leadership Success in Two Australian Schools

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Educational Leadership book series (SIEL, volume 14)

Abstract

This chapter reports on two longitudinal case studies of successful school principalship. The researchers return to the schools 5 years after the initial investigation to determine the extent to which the schools had sustained their performance. The chapter builds on the initial research findings of a primary school (student aged 5–12 years) and a specialist school (student aged 2–18 years). The subsequent changes and outcomes are described. The findings show how the principals were able to sustain success despite new challenges and changing contexts. In the case of the primary school, the principal, who we describe as a ‘restorer- builder’, was able to maintain the school’s performance. The principal of the specialist school, who we described as a ‘visionary-driver’, was not only able to build on the previous success but also to move the school in a new direction. The findings show a common set of factors that contributed to success including leadership style, personal values, and a series of strategic inventions. One major difference between the principals was their attitude to change. To some extent, the primary principal battled hard to maintain the school’s performance by wrestling against some changes, by resisting some and having to accommodate others. The principal of the specialist school also accommodated some of the changes but also used the changes to her advantage to move the school in a new direction.

Keywords

Leadership Style Specialist School Successful School School Council Strategic Intervention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Melbourne Graduate School of EducationThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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