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One-Dimensional Polyaniline Nanotubes for Enhanced Chemical and Biochemical Sensing

  • Francesca Berti
  • Giovanna Marrazza
  • Marco Mascini
  • Silvia Todros
  • Camilla Baratto
  • Matteo Ferroni
  • Guido Faglia
  • Dhana Lakshmi
  • Iva Chianella
  • Michael J. Whitcombe
  • Sergey Piletsky
  • Anthony P. F. Turner
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 91)

Abstract

In this work we explored a simple, cheap and fast route to grow polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes arranged in an ordered structure directly on an electrode surface by electrochemical polymerisation. The deposited nanostructures were electrochemically and morphologically characterised and then used as a functional substrate for biochemical sensing by combining the intrinsic advantages of nanostructures as optimal transducers and the well known benefits of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as receptors. The hybrid nanostructured-MIP sensor was applied to the molecular recognition of catechol. Moreover, a gas sensing application was also investigated by exploiting resistance variation of the polymer in presence of different gases (CO, NO2, NH3 and ethanol).

Keywords

Hybrid Electrode Nanoporous Membrane Vertex Potential PANI Nanostructures PANI Nanotubes 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesca Berti
    • 1
  • Giovanna Marrazza
    • 1
  • Marco Mascini
    • 1
  • Silvia Todros
    • 2
  • Camilla Baratto
    • 2
  • Matteo Ferroni
    • 2
  • Guido Faglia
    • 2
  • Dhana Lakshmi
    • 3
  • Iva Chianella
    • 3
  • Michael J. Whitcombe
    • 3
  • Sergey Piletsky
    • 3
  • Anthony P. F. Turner
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of FlorenceSesto FiorentinoItaly
  2. 2.Department of Chemistry and PhysicsCNR—IDASC SENSOR Laboratory, University of BresciaBresciaItaly
  3. 3.Cranfield HealthCranfield University, CranfieldBedfordshireUK

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