Biotechnology beyond Modernity?

  • Lars Reuter

Abstract

There seems little doubt that contemporary societies can be understood in so-called ‘post-modern’ terms. This view is now so common that it is nonchalantly referred to in newspapers. Allegedly, there are no longer common values or collective interpretations of reality, yet this state of nihilism has resulted in the return of philosophy.420 There is also some agreement that “the postmodern should not be understood as something purely and simply distinguished from the modern, but rather (…) as subsisting in the heart of the modern and offering the labor that will shape its representation.”421 The postmodern project is an attempt, then, to rescue modernity by deconstructing its fallacies and ideosyncracies. We encountered an example of this attitude when reflecting on the role of the human body in medicine: Levin and Solomon suggested that in postmodern medicine, the states of being are respected as well as the processes forming them. The mechanistic perception of the body can, thus, still provide images that are helpful for understanding its functions, but it needs to be balanced by the system models explaining the complexity of the occurrence of e.g. disease in terms other than mere causality.422

Keywords

Technical System Technical Progress Human Freedom Societal Development Pure Possibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrechtts 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lars Reuter
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for BioethicsUniversity of AarhusDenmark

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