Reactions of Hydroperoxides and Peroxides

  • Pat Dussault
Part of the Structure Energetics and Reactivity in Chemistry Series (SEARCH Series) book series (SEARCH, volume 2)

Abstract

This review is intended to provide both a concise overview of the chemistry of hydroperoxides and dialkylperoxides and a glimpse of newer topics not discussed in previous literature. Following a brief discussion of safety matters, the initial section discusses perhaps the most widely known aspect of peroxide chemistry, reactions involving homolytic or heterolytic cleavage of the peroxide bond. A section covering nonradical methods for hydroperoxide functionalization is followed by a discussion of the reactions of peroxyl radicals. The review concludes with a traditionally overlooked area: the successful use of hydroperoxides and peroxides as stable synthetic intermediates.

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