Abstract

The Indian education system is financed predominantly by the central (federal) and state governments. Educational statistics reveal the story of the expansion of the formal educational system which, it was assumed, would alleviate the problem of illiteracy.1 With the phenomenal expansion of the formal educational system, the literacy rate has also increased from 16.67 per cent in 1951 to 52.1 per cent in 1991 (Table 1).

Keywords

National Policy Distance Education Adult Education Human Resource Development Family Welfare 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ayyar, R. V. Vaidyanatha. 1993. Educational Planning and Administration in India: Retrospect and Prospect. Journal of Educational Planning and Administration VH(2).Google Scholar
  2. Department of Family Welfare, Government of India. 1994. India: Country Statement. A paper prepared for the International Conference on Population and Development at Cairo in September 1994. New Delhi (mimeographed).Google Scholar
  3. Directorate of Adult Education, Ministry of Education and Culture. 1984. Adult Education Components in the Development Scheme of Government of India: A Compendium. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  4. Expert Group on Population Policy. 1994. Draft National Population Policy. The document was submitted to the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, New Delhi, on May 21 1994.Google Scholar
  5. Institute of Applied Manpower Research. 1994. Manpower Profile India: Yearbook 1993-94. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  6. Ministry of Human Resource Development. 1986. National Policy on Education — 1986. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  7. Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India. 1986. National Policy on Education 1986: Programme of Action (with modifications undertaken in 1992). New Delhi.Google Scholar
  8. Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India. 1992. National Policy on Education — 1986 (with modifications undertaken in 1992. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  9. Ministry of Human Resource Development, Government of India. 1993. National Policy on Education 1986: Programme of Action, 1992. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  10. Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of Education. 1988. National Literacy Mission. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  11. Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of Education. 1990. Annual Report — 1989-90 (Part-I). New Delhi.Google Scholar
  12. Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of Education. 1993. Annual Report — 1992-93 (Part-I). New Delhi.Google Scholar
  13. National Institute of Educational Planning and Administration. 1990. Education for All by 2000: Indian Perspective. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  14. National Institute of Adult Education. 1992. Statistical Database for Literacy: Volume I. New Delhi.Google Scholar
  15. Patel, Ila. 1988. Policies and Practice of Rural Nonformal Education in India: 1947-85. Dissertation Thesis, Stanford University.Google Scholar
  16. Patel, Ila. 1992. India, in Peter Cookson, Alan Sadovnik and Susan Semel, eds., International Handbook of Educational Reform. New York: Greenwood Press Inc.Google Scholar
  17. Prem Chand. 1992. Statistical Database for Literacy; Volume I. Literacy for Age Group 7 and Above: 1981-1991 (Provisional). New Delhi: National Institute of Adult Education.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ila Patel

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations