Assessment for Learning in Language Classrooms

Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 14)

Abstract

Teachers play a crucial role in conceptualizing, interpreting and modifying assessment for learning initiatives in ways that have significant impact in the classroom. This chapter examines how the educational environments within which a reform initiative is undertaken shape the challenges teachers have to contend with for a sustainable and wider use of assessment for learning strategies. It describes an assessment project undertaken by one secondary school in Hong Kong to improve student learning of languages through classroom assessment. The chapter begins with the contextual background and conceptual framework of the initiative, followed by a description of the design of the project, and illustrative examples showing the use of assessment for learning strategies in the English and Chinese language classrooms. The impacts of the project on student learning and teacher professional enhancement are reported, and conditions for a sustainable and wider use of assessment for learning strategies are discussed.

Keywords

Assessment Task English Teacher Rich Content Classroom Assessment Language Classroom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Adamson, B., & Davison, C. (2003). Innovation in English language teaching in Hong Kong primary schools: One sep forwards, two steps sideways. Prospect, 18, 27–41.Google Scholar
  2. Adamson, B., & Davison, C. (2008). English language teaching in Hong Kong primary schools: Innovation and resistance. In Planning change, changing plans. Innovations in second language teaching (pp. 11–25). Michigan: The University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  3. Adamson, B., & Tong, S. Y. A. (2008). Leadership and collaboration in implementing curriculum change in Hong Kong secondary schools. Asia Pacific Education Review, 9(2), 181–190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Allison, D. (1999). Language testing and evaluation. Singapore: Singapore University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Assessment Reform Group (1999). Assessment for learning: Beyond the black box. Cambridge: School of Education.Google Scholar
  6. Assessment Reform Group (2002). Assessment for Learning: 10 Principles. Cambridge: University of Cambridge Faculty of Education.Google Scholar
  7. Bacon-Shone, J., & Bolton, K. (1998). Charting multilingualism: Language censuses and language surveys in Hong Kong. In M. Pennington (Ed.), Language in Hong Kong at century’s end (pp. 43–90). Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Berry, R. (2005). Entwining feedback, self and peer assessment. Academic Exchange Quarterly, 9(3), 225–229.Google Scholar
  9. Berry, R. (2008). Assessment for Learning. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Berry, R. (2010). Teachers’ orientations towards selecting assessment strategies. New Horizons in Education, 58(1), 96–107.Google Scholar
  11. Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998a). Inside the Black Box: Raising standards through classroom assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 80(2), 139–144.Google Scholar
  12. Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998b). Assessment and Classroom Learning. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 5(1), 7–74.Google Scholar
  13. Carless, D. (2005). Prospects for the implementation of assessment for learning. Assessment in Education, 12, 39–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Cheng, N. L. (2004). Hong Kong SAR. In K. W. Ho. & R. Wong (Eds.), Language policies and language education: The impact in East Asian countries in the next decade (pp. 100–114). Singapore: Eastern Universities Press.Google Scholar
  15. Cheung, W. W. (1996). The implications of implementing the Target-Oriented curriculum (TOC) for teacher education. Journal of Primary Education, 6(1–2), 37–44.Google Scholar
  16. Chow, A., & Li, B. (2008). Task-based Assessment. In A. Ma (Ed.), Practical guide to task-based curriculum planning and assessment (pp. 102–127). Hong Kong: City University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Chow, A., & Mok-Cheung, A. (2004). English language teaching in Hong Kong SAR: Tradition, transition and transformation. In W. K. Ho & R. Wong (Eds.), English language teaching in East Asia today. Changing policies and practices (pp. 150–177). Singapore: Eastern Universities Press.Google Scholar
  18. Chow, A., Tse-tso, Y. W., & Li, B. (2005). Learning English or learning through English: Evaluating an English enrichment programme in post-colonial Hong Kong. In S. May, M. Franken, & R. Barnard (Eds.), LED2003: Refereed conference proceedings of the 1st international conference on language, education and diversity. Hamilton: Wilf Malcolm Institute of Educational Research, University of Waikato.Google Scholar
  19. Clarke, D., & Hollingsworth, H. (2002). Elaborating a model of teacher professional growth. Teaching and Teacher Education, 18(8), 947–967.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Coome, C., Folse, K., & Hubley, N. (2007). A practical guide to assessing English language learners. Michigan: University of Michigan.Google Scholar
  21. Curriculum Development Council (1983). Syllabuses for secondary schools: English (Secondary 1-5). Hong Kong: Education Department.Google Scholar
  22. Curriculum Development Council (1999). Syllabuses for secondary schools. English language secondary 1-5. Hong Kong: the Printing Department.Google Scholar
  23. Curriculum Development Council (2001b). Syllabuses for secondary schools. Chinese language secondary 1-5. Hong Kong: The Printing Department.Google Scholar
  24. Curriculum Development Council (2002a). English language education. Key learning area curriculum guide (Primary 10- Secondary 3). Hong Kong: The Printing Department.Google Scholar
  25. Curriculum Development Council (2002b). Chinese language education. Key learning area curriculum guide (Primary 10- Secondary 3). Hong Kong: The Printing Department.Google Scholar
  26. Curriculum Development Council (2007a). Chinese language education key learning area English language curriculum and assessment guide (Secondary 4-6). Hong Kong: The Printing Department.Google Scholar
  27. Curriculum Development Council (2007b). English language education key learning area English language curriculum and assessment guide (Secondary 4-6). Hong Kong: The Printing Department.Google Scholar
  28. Fontana, D., & Fernandes, M. (1994). Improvements in mathematics performance as a consequence of self-assessment in Portuguese primary school pupils. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 64, 407–417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Ho, M. S. (2003). A critical review of Hong Kong Chinese language education reform at the turn of the century. Hong Kong: Cultural Education Publishing (In Chinese).Google Scholar
  30. Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority (2005). 2007 HKCE English language examination. In Introduction to the school-based assessment component. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authority.Google Scholar
  31. Kennedy, K. J., Chan, K. S. J., Fok, P. K., & Yu, W. M. (2008). Forms of assessment and their potential for enhancing learning: Conceptual and cultural issues. Educational Research for Policy and Practice, 7(3), 197–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Lai, M. L. (2005). Language attitudes of the first postcolonial generation in Hong Kong secondary schools. Language in Society, 34(4), 363–388.Google Scholar
  33. Lai, M. L., & Chow, A. (2010, June). Medium of instruction policies in postcolonial Hong Kong – the national or international agenda? In The international conference on who needs languages? Micro and macro perspectives into language education policies. (pp. 7–10). Finland: University of Jyväskylä.Google Scholar
  34. Lee, K. S. (1995). The trend of Chinese language teaching in the 90’s. Modern Education Bulletin, 19, 46–49.Google Scholar
  35. Lord, R., & Cheng, H. (Eds.) (1987). Language education in Hong Kong. Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Morris, P. (1992). Preparing pupils as citizens of the special administrative region of Hong Kong: An analysis of curriculum change and control during the transition period. In G. Postiglione (Ed.), Education and society in Hong Kong: Towards one country and two systems (pp. 117–145). Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Morris, P. (1995). The Hong Kong school curriculum. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Morris, P. (2000). The commissioning and decommissioning of curriculum reforms: The career of the target-oriented curriculum. In B. Adamson, T. Kwan, & K. K. Chan (Eds.), Changing the curriculum: The impact of reform on Hong Kong’s primary schools (pp. 21–40). Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  39. Morris, P., Lo, M. L., & Adamson, B. (2000). Improving schools in Hong Kong: Lessons from the past. In B. Adamson, T. Kwan, & K. K. Chan (Eds.), Changing the curriculum: The impact of reform on Hong Kong’s primary schools (pp. 245–262). Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  40. Pong, W.Y., & Chow, J.C.S. (2002). On the pedagogy of examinations in Hong Kong: Teaching and Teacher Education, 18(2), 139–149.Google Scholar
  41. Territory–wide System Assessment (TSA) (2009). Accessed August 3, 2009, from http://www.systemassessment.edu.hk/sec/eng/index_eng.htm/
  42. Torrance, H. (2007). Assessment as learning? How the use of explicit learning objectives, assessment criteria and feedback in post-secondary education and training can come to dominate learning. Assessment in Education, 14(3), 281–294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Torrance, H., & Pryor, J. (1998). Investigating formative assessment. Buckingham: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  44. Tse, S. K. (2009). Chinese language education in Hong Kong: Twenty five years of educational research in Hong Kong. Educational Research Journal, 24(2), 231–255.Google Scholar
  45. Tse, S. K., Chan, W. S., Ho, W. K., Law, N., Lee, T., Shek, C., et al. (1995). Chinese language education for the 21st century: A Hong Kong perspective. Hong Kong: Faculty of Education, University of Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  46. Tsui, A. B. M. (2004). Medium of instruction in Hong Kong: One country, two systems, whose language? In J. J. W. Tollefson & A. B. M. Tsui (Eds.), Medium of instruction polices: Which agenda? Whose agenda? (pp. 97–116). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.Google Scholar
  47. Watkins, C., Carnell, E., Lodge, C., Wagner, P., & Whalley, C. (2002). Effective learning, ISIN. Research Matters, 17, 1–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Wong, H. W. (2000). In search of the knowledge base of curriculum design and teaching. Hong Kong: Institute of Educational Research, the Chinese University of Hong Kong. (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  49. Wong, H. W., & Lee, Y. Y. (2006). Developing student potentials in a collaborative culture: A case study of implementing the newly revised Chinese language syllabus for secondary schools. Hong Kong: Institute of Educational Research, the Chinese University of Hong Kong. (in Chinese).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of English, Hong Kong Institute of EducationTai PoHong Kong
  2. 2.Department of Chinese, Hong Kong Institute of EducationTai PoHong Kong

Personalised recommendations