The Sustainable City: Necessary System Shifts and Their Conditions

  • Mattias Höjer
  • Anders Gullberg
  • Ronny Pettersson
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter, which is divided into three sections, will initially offer responses to the three introductory questions.

The first is how a city and urban life might appear should the requirements of a sustainable development in fact be fulfilled. This is the subject of the first section titled The City in the Images of the Future. As much of the book deals with this theme, this section will to a great extent serve as a summary of earlier chapters.

Keywords

Public Transport Urban Resident Energy Price System Shift Urban Core 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mattias Höjer
    • 1
  • Anders Gullberg
    • 2
  • Ronny Pettersson
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Sustainable CommunicationsRoyal Institute of TechnologyStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Committee for Stockholm ResearchStockholmSweden
  3. 3.Department of Economic HistoryStockholm UniversityStockholmSweden

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