Preparing Instructional Leaders

  • David Gurr
  • Lawrie Drysdale
  • Rose M. Ylimaki
  • Lejf Moos
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Educational Leadership book series (SIEL, volume 12)

Abstract

This section explores implications of ISSPP study for school leadership training relative to instructional leadership practices. Drawing on the conceptual understandings from Chap. 4, the authors consider leadership preparation programs in their own country in light of their findings. Specifically, this chapter examines leadership preparation in the USA, Australia , and Denmark and then makes recommendations for leadership preparation in light of recommendations made earlier.

Keywords

Professional Learning School Leader Educational Leadership Average Effect Size Professional Learning Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Gurr
    • 1
  • Lawrie Drysdale
    • 1
  • Rose M. Ylimaki
    • 2
  • Lejf Moos
    • 3
  1. 1.University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.University of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  3. 3.Danish School of EducationUniversity of AarhusAarhusDenmark

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