Setting the Context: Oxford’s Changing Academic and Social Demography

Chapter
Part of the Higher Education Dynamics book series (HEDY, volume 34)

Abstract

This book complements our Collegial Tradition in the Age of Mass Higher Education (Tapper & Palfreyman, 2010). It presents an interpretation of how the collegial tradition has evolved, and is still evolving, within the University of Oxford, which – arguably – is but one of only two collegiate universities in today’s world of higher education. The University of Cambridge offers the other, and somewhat different, model of the collegiate university. This volume parallels its first edition in the sense that it looks at the University of Oxford through a particular prism rather than presenting an in-depth broader overview of the contemporary university. In this book the collegiate university finds both its natural home and fullest expression within the University of Oxford.

Keywords

Graduate College League Table Collegial Tradition Research Assessment Exercise British System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. All Souls College. (2010, 25 February). http://www.all-souls.ox.ac.uk/
  2. Cheng, K.-M., Wang, Y., & Pan, S.-Y. (2009). The legacy of planning: Higher education development in China. In D. Palfreyman & T. Tapper (Eds.), Structuring mass higher education: The role of elite institutions (pp. 153–168). New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  3. Chester, J., & Bekhradnia, B. (2009). Oxford and Cambridge – How different are they? Oxford: Higher Education Policy Institute.Google Scholar
  4. Halsey, A. H. (1995). The decline of donnish dominion. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  5. Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). (2008–2009). Students and qualifiers data. Cheltenham: HESA.Google Scholar
  6. Kehm, B., & Pasternack, P. (2009). The German “excellence initiative” and its role in restructuring the national higher education landscape. In D. Palfreyman & T. Tapper (Eds.), Structuring mass higher education: The role of elite institutions (pp. 113–127). New York: Routledge/Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  7. Kitagawa, F. (2009). (Post-) mass higher education and Japanese elite universities. In D. Palfreyman & T. Tapper (Eds.), Structuring mass higher education: The role of elite institutions (pp. 257–280). New York: Routledge/Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  8. Marginson, S. (2006). Dynamics of national and global competition in higher education. Higher Education, 52, 1–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Palfreyman, D., & Tapper, T. (2009). What is an ‘elite’ or ‘leading global’ university. In T. Tapper & D. Palfreyman (Eds.), Structuring mass higher education: The role of elite institutions (pp. 203–218). New York: Routledge, Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  10. Soares, J. (1999). The decline of privilege: The modernization of Oxford University. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Tapper, T., & Filippakou, O. (2009). The world-class league tables and the sustaining of international reputations in higher education. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 31(1), 55–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Tapper, T., & Palfreyman, D. (2010). The collegial tradition in the age of mass higher education. Dordrecht: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Tapper, T., & Salter, B. (1992). Oxford, Cambridge and the changing idea of the university. Buckingham: Open University Press/SRHE.Google Scholar
  14. Times Higher Education. (2006, October 6th). World university rankings.Google Scholar
  15. Times Higher Education. (2007, November 9th). World university rankings.Google Scholar
  16. Times Higher Education. (2009, October 8th). World university rankings.Google Scholar
  17. University of Oxford. (1966a). Commission of inquiry: Report, Franks Commission. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  18. University of Oxford. (1966b). Commission of inquiry: Statistical appendix, Franks Commission. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  19. University of Oxford. (1996). Commission of inquiry: Consultative paper on the university’s objectives, structure, size and shape, North Commission. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  20. University of Oxford. (1997a). Commission of inquiry: Report, North Commission. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  21. University of Oxford. (1997b). Commission of inquiry: Supplementary volume, North Commission. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  22. University of Oxford. (2006, November 2nd). In defence of democratic governance: Amendments for 14 November. Gazette, 4786.Google Scholar
  23. University of Oxford (2007, July). Review of the permanent private halls associated with the University of Oxford. Oxford: Review Panel.Google Scholar
  24. University of Oxford. (2009, October 7th). Address by the incoming Vice-Chancellor. Gazette, 4892(Suppl. 3).Google Scholar
  25. Usher, A., & Savino, M. (2006). A world of difference: A global survey of university league tables. Toronto, ON: Educational Policy Institute.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.OtterbourneUK
  2. 2.Oxford Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies, New CollegeOxfordUK

Personalised recommendations