Creating Positive Social Change Through Building Positive Organizations: Four Levels of Intervention

Chapter

Abstract

There is no doubt that in the last decade applications of positive psychology in the workplace have provided organizations with “another way” of doing business and managing people. The term “positive organization” shares its origins with Seligman’s (2002) third pillar of authentic happiness as being “positive institutions.” While the first pillar of positive emotion, and the second pillar of positive characteristics have been examined in detail, the third pillar of positive institutions has received less attention – which is probably symptomatic of psychology’s typically predominant focus on the individual or interpersonal level of interaction, as distinct from the level of the institution, community, or social system (of course with exceptions – please allow us to speak in general terms here).

Keywords

Positive Emotion Positive Psychology Team Climate Appreciative Inquiry Positive Psychology Intervention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Baumeister, R. F., Bratslavsky, E., Finkenauer, C., & Vohs, K. D. (2001). Bad is stronger than good. Review of General Psychology, 5, 323–370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cameron, K., & Lavine, M. (2006). Making the impossible possible: Leading extraordinary performance: The Rocky Flats story. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.Google Scholar
  3. Christakis, N., & Fowler, J. (2010). Amazing power of social networks and how they shape our lives. HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  4. Cooperrider, D., & Whitney, D. (2005). Appreciative inquiry: A positive revolution in change. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Cooperrider, D., & Whitney, D. (2008). Appreciative inquiry handbook: For leaders of change. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.Google Scholar
  6. Drucker, P. F. (1967). The effective executive. London: Heinemann.Google Scholar
  7. Emery, F. E., & Trist, E. L. (1960). Socio-technical systems. In C. W. Churchman & M. Verhurst (Eds.), Management sciences, models and techniques (Vol. 2, pp. 83–97). London: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  8. Farquhar, K. (2006). Intervention phase. In B. B. Jones & M. Brazzel (Eds.), The NTL handbook of organizational development and change. San Francisco: Pfeiffer.Google Scholar
  9. Fredrickson, B. L. (2009). Positivity: Discover the ratio that tips your life toward flourishing. New York: Crown Books.Google Scholar
  10. Fredrickson, B. L., & Losada, M. (2005). Positive emotions and the complex dynamics of human flourishing. American Psychologist, 60, 678–686.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Garcea, N., Harrington, S., & Linley, P. A.  (2009). Building Positive Organizations. In P. A. Linley, S. Harrington & N. Garcea (Eds.), Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology and Work. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Govindji, R., & Linley, P. A. (2007). Strengths use, self-concordance and well-being: Implications for strengths coaching and coaching psychologists. International Coaching Psychology Review, 2(2), 143–153.Google Scholar
  13. Herrero, L. (2008). Viral Change: the alternative to slow, painful and unsuccessful management of change in organisation. Beaconsfield, UK: Meetingminds.Google Scholar
  14. Hilton, S., & Gibbons, G. (2002). Good business: Your world needs you. London: Texere.Google Scholar
  15. Hogan, R. (2007). Personality and the fate of organizations. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  16. Laszlo, C. (2008). Sustainable value: How the world’s leading companies are doing well by doing good. Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing.Google Scholar
  17. Leach, M. (2006). Changing organizations and systems from the outside: OD practitioners as agents for social change. In B. B. Jones & M. Brazzel (Eds.), The NTL handbook of organizational development and change. San Francisco: Pfeiffer.Google Scholar
  18. Linley, P. A., Joseph, S., Harrington, S., & Wood, A. M. (2006). Positive psychology: Past, present, and (possible) future. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1, 3–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lippitt, R. (1980). Choosing the future you prefer. Washington, DC: Development.Google Scholar
  20. Losada, M., & Heaphy, E. (2004). The role of positivity and connectivity in the performance of business teams: A nonlinear dynamics model. American Behavioral Scientist, 47(6), 740–765.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Marshak, R. J. (2006). Covert processes at work: Managing the five hidden dimensions of organizational change. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.Google Scholar
  22. Minahan, M. (2006). Working with groups in organizations. In B. B. Jones & M. Brazzel (Eds.), The NTL handbook of organizational development and change. San Francisco: Pfeiffer.Google Scholar
  23. Minhas, G. (2010). Developing realised and unrealised strengths: Implications for engagement, self-esteem, life satisfaction and well-being. Assessment and Development Matters, 2(1), 12–16Google Scholar
  24. Morris, D., & Garrett, J. (2009). Strengths: Your leading edge. In P. A. Linley, S. Harrington, & N. J. Garcea (Eds.), Oxford handbook of positive psychology and work. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Naumann, S. E., & Bennett, N. (2000). A case for procedural justice climate: Development and test of a multilevel model. Academy of Management Journal, 43, 881–889.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Page, N., & Carter, D. (2008). Strengths-based organization. In S. J. Lopez (Ed.), The encyclopaedia of positive psychology. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  27. Rozin, P., & Royzam, E. (2001). Negativity bias, negativity dominance, and contagion. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 5, 296–320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Schein, E. H. (2009). Helping: How to offer, give, and receive help. New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  29. Seligman, M. E. P. (2002). Authentic happiness. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  30. Seligman, M. E. P., Steen, T. A., Park, N., & Peterson, C. (2005). Positive psychology progress: Empirical validation of interventions. American Psychologist, 60(5), 410–421.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Sheldon, K. M., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2006). How to increase and sustain positive emotion: The effects of expressing gratitude and visualizing best possible selves. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 1, 73–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Sin, N. L., & Lyubomirsky, S. (2009). Enhancing well-being and alleviating depressive symptoms with positive psychology interventions: A practice-friendly meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session, 65, 467–487.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Ulrich, D. (2009). The abundant organization [foreword]. In P. A. Linley, S. Harrington, & N. Garcea (Eds.), Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology and Work. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Weisbord, M. R. (1987). Productive workplaces: Organizing and managing for dignity, meaningand community. San Francisco: Jossey-Basss.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre of Applied Positive PsychologyCoventryUK

Personalised recommendations