Monocultural Plantings

Chapter
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 8)

Abstract

Natural forest regrowth is an attractive form of reforestation but it is not always possible to achieve. This is especially true where forests have been cleared and replaced by large expanses of grasslands that are regularly burned. It is even more difficult when lands have been heavily degraded and soil conditions have changed or where any remaining patches of natural forest are so scarce so that tree seeds must be dispersed over long distances. Under these circumstances tree-planting is a more reliable form of reforestation. Tree plantations do have some advantages and one of these is their capacity to generate greater financial returns than natural regeneration. There are a number of reasons for this. One is because the species used can be chosen to meet specific needs or markets. Likewise, plantations can be established in locations that reduce transport and other costs (e.g. flatter ground at sites close to good roads, markets or ports). Finally, the productivity of plantations is usually much greater than most regenerating natural forests because of site preparation and fertilizer use. These advantages mean that plantations can be very efficient and profitable producers of goods such as timber and therefore be attractive ways in which to carry out reforestation.

Keywords

Ecosystem Service Natural Forest Short Rotation Industrial Grower Rotation Length 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Mined Land RehabilitationUniversity of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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