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Quality of Life Model Development and Use in the Field of Intellectual Disability

  • Robert L. Schalock
  • Kenneth D. Keith
  • Miguel Á. Verdugo
  • Laura E. Gómez
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 41)

Abstract

This chapter makes a distinction between logic models that provide a visual map or narrative description of how specific program components are related to a program’s desired results and an operational model that depicts key concepts and variables involved in understanding, operationalizing, and applying a phenomenon such as the quality of life (QOL) construct. The four sections of the chapter (a) describe how the authors have approached the first step of model development (formulating and validating a QOL conceptual and measurement framework); (b) describe how the model has been operationalized through its definition, components (concepts, indicators, and moderator–mediator variables), and premises; (c) suggest a number of criteria that can be used to evaluate any empirically derived model; and (d) reference how the model has been applied in four areas important to the application of the QOL construct in the field of intellectual and closely related developmental disabilities. The chapter should be read and understood within the context of the significant conceptual and empirical work that has occurred over the last three decades regarding the QOL concept. The work described in this chapter reflects the evolution of the concept from a philosophical concept to a measurable construct, and from a measurable construct to an operational model supported by considerable data, serving as a basis for application and hypothesis testing.

Keywords

Concept Mapping Mediator Variable Measurement Framework Personal Outcome Specific Program Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors are appreciative of the inputs and suggestions given by these valued colleagues at the University of Salamanca (Institute on Community Integration, School of Psychology) in Spain (Benito Arias, Maria Gómez-Vela, Pedro Jimenez Navarro, Esther Navallas, and Fabian Sainz) and Dr. Gordon Bonham (Bonham Research – Baltimore, MD).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Schalock
    • 1
  • Kenneth D. Keith
    • 2
  • Miguel Á. Verdugo
    • 3
  • Laura E. Gómez
    • 3
  1. 1.Hastings CollegeHastingsUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.School of Psychology-University of Salamanca, Institute on Community Integration, University of SalamancaSalamancaSpain

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