Developing Entrepreneurial Leaders

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Educational Leadership book series (SIEL, volume 11)

Abstract

The value and importance of entrepreneurial leadership in education, unlike other facets of educational leadership, is very context-dependent and is also closely associated with individual personality attributes. As a consequence, development of entrepreneurial leadership requires at least as much attention to the current context of schooling systems and to the aptitudes of educators as to the curricula of entrepreneurial leadership development. Those two entrepreneur-relevant features are examined here and their implications for leadership development discussed.

Keywords

Professional Development Program Charter School Entrepreneurial Opportunity Educational Leader Entrepreneurial Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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