Hybridization and Chineseness in the Philippines

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the Chinese in contemporary Philippines. In some ways, the Chinese here exhibit characteristics that are different when compared to the Chinese in other Southeast Asian countries. For example, many of the Chinese have converted to Christianity, although, as the chapter will show, their religion is hybridized, an intermixing of traditional Chinese Taoist and Buddhist practices with Christian beliefs and rituals. Also, unlike many Southeast Asian countries, the Chinese did not have to contend with overt ethnic discrimination by the state. As such, in the Philippines, a large number of Chinese schools and community organizations continue to perform important functions for the Chinese community.

Keywords

Ethnic Identity Young Generation Chinese Culture Chinese Language Retail Trade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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