Abstract

Living in a three-dimensional world, it is quite difficult for us to imagine a fourth geometric dimension, perpendicular to the three we already know. But a 4D geometry does not break any mathematical rule and indeed mathematicians have been studying it since the eighteenth century. Ideas referring to a 4D world have then spread beyond the math world and have inspired painters, sculptors, writers, and architects. Modern computer graphics allows us to get some more insight into this fascinating world.

Keywords

Sphere Surface Stereographic Projection Solid Torus Concentric Sphere Regular Polyhedron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Digital Video S.p.A, matematitaRomeItalic

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