Photochemical and Photophysical Characterization

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter highlights the photophysical and photochemical parameters of photosensitizers, with a focus on the different measuring and calculation methods. Singlet oxygen generation, photodegradation quantum yield, fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime and triple state quantum yield and lifetime of the photosensitizers are detailed and data regarding these parameters for photosensitizing phthalocyanines are summarized. The effects of number and position of substituents, nature of central metal and solvents on these parameters of phthalocyanine photosensitizers are also given in Table 4.1.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chemistry DepartmentGebze Institute of TechnologyGebzeTurkey

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