Coteaching in International Contexts pp 1-7

Part of the Cultural Studies of Science Education book series (CSSE, volume 1)

Introduction to Coteaching

Chapter

Abstract

Coteaching is two or more teachers teaching together, sharing responsibility for meeting the learning needs of students and, at the same time, learning from each other. Coteachers plan, teach and evaluate lessons together, working as collaborators on every aspect of instruction. Over the past decade, coteaching has become an increasingly important element of science teacher education and it is expanding into other content areas and educational settings as a result of research, which has shown that it can be highly beneficial to both students and teachers. Indeed, two chapter authors of this volume (Karen Kerr and Matthew Juck) acted as student teacher coteachers during their preservice teacher education programmes. Kerr, from Northern Ireland, taught for 2 years and then completed her Ph.D. in primary science education. She is now working as a postdoctoral research fellow on coteaching.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.DublinIreland
  2. 2.NewarkUSA

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