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The “Philosophy” in Japanese Buddhist Philosophy

  • John C. Maraldo
Chapter
Part of the Dao Companions to Chinese Philosophy book series (DCCP, volume 8)

Abstract

The chapters in this book focus on a phenomenon that is named by a conjunction of three terms: Japanese, Buddhist, philosophy. Each of these terms implies a distinction demarcating one domain of inquiry from other related domains: Japanese as distinct from Chinese, Korean, or Indian; Buddhist as distinct from Confucian or Shintō; and philosophy as distinct from religion or psychology. Each of these terms, the three in question as well as their contrasts, reflects a distinctly modern category that abstracts from historical realities that blur the distinctions. With this qualification in mind, this chapter clarifies the terms in question, then selects two themes: language-reality-truth, and the nature of Buddhist practice, and gives a sample of philosophical methods and styles of argumentation that characterize “Japanese Buddhist philosophy.” For the most part, the selection here is limited to examples from pre-modern times, before Japanese Buddhists had encountered western philosophy and began to present Buddhism in its terms.

Works Cited

Abbreviations

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • John C. Maraldo
    • 1
  1. 1.University of North FloridaJacksonvilleUSA

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