Nanotechnology and Quasicrystals: From Self-Assembly to Photonic Applications

  • R. Lifshitz
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-90-481-2523-4_10

Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB)
Cite this paper as:
Lifshitz R. (2009) Nanotechnology and Quasicrystals: From Self-Assembly to Photonic Applications. In: Magarshak Y., Kozyrev S., Vaseashta A.K. (eds) Silicon Versus Carbon. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics. Springer, Dordrecht

After providing a concise overview on quasicrystals and their discovery more than a quarter of a century ago, I consider the unexpected interplay between nano-technology and quasiperiodic crystals. Of particular relevance are efforts to fabricate artificial functional micro- or nanostructures, as well as efforts to control the self-assembly of nanostructures, where current knowledge about the possibility of having long-range order without periodicity can provide significant advantages. I discuss examples of systems ranging from artificial metamaterials for photonic applications, through self-assembled soft matter, to surface waves and optically-induced nonlinear photonic quasicrystals.

Keywords

quasicrystals quasiperiodic crystals nanostructures self-assembly soft matter meta-materials nonlinear photonic crystals surface waves Faraday waves 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Lifshitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics & AstronomyTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael

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